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20130129
20130206
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for a change? >> i think that is where all the initiative and where all the energy is going right now. this is president obama's sequester. the president has failed up until now to come up and offer anything specific beyond talking points and press conferences as to how he proposes to turn the sequester off. and absent that, we don't have any changes. >> many that i thinkthanks, pet. tomorrow i'll chat with eric cantor. he made a major address today at the american enterprise institute. he had across the board ideas to reinvigorate the republican party and the national economy. again, mr. cantor will join me tomorrow. next up this evening, we had a nice recovery rally in the markets today. but here's what i want to know. what effect will the sequester have on stocks? will it be as dire as some say or might it be bullish. we'll get answers. free market capitalism, the best path to prosperity. free market capitalism says shrink government spending to grow the economy. i'm larry kudlow. we'll be right back. all right that's a fifth-floor problem... ok. not in my house! ha ha ha! ha ha ha
energy. right away i'm suspicious. >> a few days before the big game the superdome being lauded for efficiency. so efficient they turned off a half the lights for half the game. according to the nfl there was an abnormality like a power surge and a breaker kicked in. they knew what it was quickly. it takes a while to restart it because generators kicked in. if it was all dark it would have been difficult. everyone was calm. the game was delayed 34 minutes. it was just an embarrassment at best. we don't know exactly what happened. we didn't get a lot of information. >> thankfully it didn't go all dark. that would have been a disaster. that's good. boomer esiason, analyst and former mvp of the nfl, said during rehearsals last week on two occasions beyonce blew out the electricity. >> he said that. >> he said it today, all over the place. >> the other thing. >> he's a smart guy. it's beyonce meets solyndra. >> i spent three days and i was surprised how much of the infrastructure wasn't finished by thursday. they were still constructing a bunch of things leading up to friday. it see
'd go across the board so much, i'd go commerce, labor, education, interior, energy. are you kidding me? i would slash everything. i would take out at least a quarter. at least a quarter. i don't care, sequester, i don't even know what it means. what i know is let's get rid of these goofy departments that are bankrupting america. what's your take on that? >> well, got to disagree with you. >> oh. [ laughter ] >> i think that there's certainly a time and place for cuts. as you say earlier, it's usually when the economy is working a little bit better than it is now. i think if you look back historically, the best time for cuts is back to trend growth, which is 3%, not the 2% economy that we're in now. i'll tell you, i just came last week from the world economic forum, one of the big conversation threads there was that we don't want to be europe. europe has gone too far with austerity. and you might say well that's a liberal point of view. but i'll tell you, the american enterprise institute came out with a report this week saying we should take lessons from overseas. we should not do aust
. housing improvement. the energy boom is one of the most outstanding parts of this economy. we may even be seeing a comeback in capital goods business investment, durable goods, factory orders and all that. so maybe we're underestimating the great american economic machine. i know washington's gone wrong. but maybe the internals of the economy are better than we think. >> well, i'm not going to underestimate the private sector. and i'll tell you, one big advantage this economy has right now, we talk a lot about what the economy did in the '80s, that the profit sector is in much, much better shape than it was back coming out of that recession '81, '82. there still had to be a lot of restructuring, there's a lot of inefficiency from the 1970s. so we're starting with a much healthier private sector. i really think that's, we still have some good demand coming from outside the united states. we have china and all things -- we're not worried about the china hard landing. we're not worried about the debt ceiling crisis. we're not worried about, well, for the moment, the eu -- we have that kin
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4